Baldur was one of the Deities who met with the other deities to try to work out a way to stop the Apocalypse. Along with Kali, he appeared to be one of the most powerful of the deities present. It was also implied that he was in some sort of relationship with Kali. Baldur was killed by Lucifer after trying to stop him.

BackgroundEdit

Baldur

Baldur is killed by Lucifer.

History Edit

Baldur, alongside Odin, was a member of the Norse pantheon. Neither gods realized that Loki was in fact an archangel in disguise, and the three presumably spent some time together.

At some point, Baldur entered into a romantic relationship with the Hindu goddess Kali, either before or after Kali's fling with Loki.

Season 5 Edit

Baldur accompanied a handful of other gods to a meeting at Elysian Fields Hotel to discuss the upcoming Apocalypse. They also had entrapped Sam and Dean Winchester, planning on either using them as bait or kill them to avert the Apocalypse.

Unexpectedly, they were joined by Loki, who insisted that the Apocalypse couldn't be stopped and took Sam and Dean aside. Kali was aware however, that Loki was in fact the archangel Gabriel and stole his archangel blade to seemingly kill him, while hoping to use it to kill the other archangels too.

Dean later revealed to Baldur and Kali that Gabriel had given Kali a fake blade and faked his death. Meanwhile, Mercury sold out the meeting to Lucifer, who began massacring the deities. Despite Dean's insistence that the gods allowed them to escape, Baldur and Kali were being forced to stay by Lucifer himself.

When Lucifer finally entered the main dining room, Baldur confronted him, questioning on who gave the archangel the right to take the planet. Kali pleaded with Baldur to step aside, instead she was forced to watch Lucifer kill Baldur by punching him straight through the chest. Lucifer quickly discarded Baldur's body.

Baldur was the last god to die in the massacre, since Kali survived thanks to Gabriel.

Personality Edit

Unlike his fellow Deities, Baldur was a respectful and civilized gentleman. He had a very fair persona, even referring to Sam and Dean as guests of honor. He did however retain a bit of pride, as he did not believe Lucifer had the right to own the planet or cause the Apocalypse.

According to Kali, Baldur had a sweet personality, much to her distaste.

Physical Appearance Edit

Baldur takes the form of a handsome human male adult with black hair and dresses in a black suit.

Powers and Abilities Edit

As a deity, he was quite strong and believed himself to be a match for Lucifer.

Weaknesses Edit

AppearancesEdit

In LoreEdit

In Norse mythology, Baldur is one of the many sons of Odin and Frigg, though Odin had a few wives, one of the eldest. According to Jacob Grimm, Baldr's name equates to the Old High German and Old English words for "lord," "prince," or "king," but in continental Saxon and Anglo-Saxon tradition, he is called Baldag, instead, "dag" equating to "day" and relating to just as many - if not more - of Baldr's archetypal attributes. Baldr has a wife, Nanna, a lesser domestic goddess presiding over the care and early education of children, and a son, Forseti, a god of justice renowned for his ability to settle disputes. His hall, Breidablik ("the broadly gleaming"), was said to be the most beautiful place in the Nine Worlds, and his ship, Hringhorni, could be folded up and fly in the sky or sail on the seas and was said to be the greatest ever built.

The Death of Baldr is one of the most prominent themes in the 12th and 13th century poetry written almost exclusively by Snorri Sturluson, and there are several references to it in both the Prose Edda and the Poetic Edda. Upon Baldr's birth, his mother - Frigg, the Norse Queen of Heaven - took an oath from every living creature save a single bit of mistletoe, which she deemed too young to swear an oath of its own accord. Loki, possibly jealous of Baldr's reputation as the most beloved and fairest of the deities, manipulated the blind god Hodr into striking Baldr with a dart poisoned with that same mistletoe. Baldr's death is one of the greatest tragedies in Icelandic poetry, and the grief of his mother, Frigg, is fundamentally reminiscent of the Pieta, and the Virgin Mary grieving over the body of Jesus Christ.

Baldr undoubtedly belongs to the same family of Dying Deities as the Greco-Phoenician Adonis and the Egyptian Osiris, and probably originally had agricultural significance as a sun god. He was a god of beauty, peace, and wisdom, and no mention is made of him participating in any battle, possibly because his death occurs well before the assumed events of Ragnarok; these are actually fairly unusual characteristics for a Norse deity, and similar passivity in Bragi, the Norse god of poetry, is openly mocked.

TriviaEdit

  • It should be worth noting that "Hammer of the Gods" was not aired in India, most likely to avoid controversy over a Hindu goddess Kali (who is married and whose son is Ganesh) being sexually involved with a foreign god and the fact that the show wrongly depicted Kali in an erotic way offended many fans.
  • Being a god of love and light, it is possible Baldur had abilities to affect emotions, or photokinetic powers that he didn't get a chance to display on the show.

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